Pioneer Courthouse

PIONEER COURTHOUSE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Pioneer Courthouse
GALLERIES

Members of the Board of Pioneer Courthouse Historical Society

Ryan Bounds

Ryan Bounds
president

Ryan Bounds began his legal career in the Pioneer Courthouse, where he served as a law clerk for Circuit Judge Diarmuid F. O’Scannlain. He is now an assistant United States attorney for the District of Oregon and prosecutes defendants charged with fraud and environmental crimes. Before joining the U.S. Attorney’s office in Portland, he served as special assistant to President George W. Bush for justice and immigration policy, as chief of staff and deputy assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Policy, and as a federal prosecutor in Washington, D.C. He is a native of Eastern Oregon and graduated from Hermiston’s public schools before obtaining his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University and his J.D. from Yale Law School.

Gersham Goldstein

Gersham Goldstein
treasurer

Gersham Goldstein is Of Counsel at Stoel Rives, LLP in Portland, Oregon. He concentrates his practice primarily in federal and state taxation matters, including income taxation of individuals, partnerships and corporations, and estate planning. He represents taxpayers in federal and state tax controversies and has a substantial tax planning and advisory practice. He is editor in chief of the Journal of Corporate Taxation and compiler of the Index to Federal Tax Articles. He collaborated with Professors Boris I. Bittker and James S. Eustice to produce the seventh edition of Federal Income Taxation of Corporations and Shareholders. An extensive lecturer to tax institutes and bar groups, Gersham was the Charles S. Lyon Visiting Professor of Taxation from Practice at New York University Law School in the fall of 1991, and also was a faculty member of the New York University Law School Graduate Tax Program for many years.

Professional Activities

  • • Fellow, American College of Tax Counsel
  • • Member, Tax Section, (former member, Council; former chair,
    Committee on the Standards of Tax Practice; former vice chair and editor-in-chief of volumes 52 and 53 of The Tax Lawyer, Publications Committee), American Bar Association
  • • Member, Oregon State Bar Association
  • • Member, American Law Institute
  • • Member, Treasurer, Ninth Judicial Circuit Historical Society for many years and President from 2002-2004.
Kristian Roggendorf

Kristian Roggendorf
secretary

Kristian Roggendorf is a lawyer in private practice in Lake Oswego. His solo law practice, Roggendorf Law LLC, represents plaintiffs in civil lawsuits in both state and federal court. Kristian focuses on advocating for victims of child abuse against institutions that allowed the abuse to occur. Kristian also has a significant appellate practice and represents land owners in eminent domain/condemnation cases as well as citizens whose rights have been violated by government agents. He has represented parties in dozens of reported cases, including a pair of landmark child abuse decisions from the Oregon Supreme Court.

In addition to serving as Secretary for the Pioneer Courthouse Historical Society, Kristian is currently the president of the Portland Federalist Society lawyers chapter, a member of the Oregon Trial Lawyers Association amicus committee, and in the past has served on the Oregon Advisory Commission for the US Commission on Civil Rights. Kristian graduated in May 2001 from Northwestern School of Law at Lewis and Clark College with a Certificate in Environmental Law. He earned his B.A. cum laude in Political Science from the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg in 1996. Away from the office, he enjoys hiking, snowboarding, target shooting, reading political philosophy, and spending as much time as possible with his wife Heather and his two young children.

Matthew Kalmanson

Matthew Kalmanson

Matt is a partner in the appellate department of Hart Wagner LLP. Matt’s admiration of the Pioneer Courthouse began during his clerkship for Judge Susan Graber in 2000-2001, and since then has had the pleasure of arguing numerous cases in its historic courtroom. Matt is an editor of the Verdict magazine, has presented on developments in state and federal law, and is the author of various articles in bar publications. He is on the Executive Committee of the Constitutional Law Section of the Oregon State Bar, and has served as a member of the Oregon Appellate Rules and Uniform Civil Jury Instructions Committees. He is a graduate of Yale Law School and the Honors Program at the University of Massachusetts.

Marianne King

Hon. Erin Lagesen

The Honorable Erin C. Lagesen was appointed by Governor Kitzhaber to the Oregon Court of Appeals in 2013. She began her legal career in the Pioneer Courthouse, where she served as a law clerk to Judge Susan P. Graber. Judge Lagesen subsequently worked as a litigation associate at Stoel Rives LLP and served in the appellate division of the Oregon Department of Justice. In the latter capacity, she routinely argued on behalf of the State in federal cases heard in the Pioneer Courthouse’s majestic courtroom.

Judge Lagesen serves on executive committee of the Oregon State Bar Constitutional Law section, and is a past chair of that section. She also is one of the coaches for the Franklin high school “We the People” constitutional law team.

Judge Lagesen is a Portland native. She is a graduate of Robert Gray Elementary School, Wilson High School, Williams College (B.A. cum laude in English and Mathematics, with honors in Mathematics), University of Oregon (M.S. Mathematics), Harvard University Graduate School of Education (Ed.M. Teaching and Curriculum), and Willamette University College of Law (J.D. summa cum laude). She taught high school mathematics before attending law school.

Scott McCurdy

Scott McCurdy

Scott McCurdy was the Portland librarian for the Ninth Circuit from 1982-2013. In that capacity, he had the good fortune to have an office in, and serve the judges of, the Pioneer Courthouse for over 30 years. He spent the first five years of his career as the Law Librarian of the Office of the Secretary of Treasury in Washington D.C., in another building designed by the architect of the Pioneer Courthouse, Alfred P. Mullet, the Main Treasury Building. Scott is also a Member of the Board of Directors of the U.S. District Court Historical Society. He obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of Oregon and his MLS from the University of Maryland.

Peter Meijer

Peter Meijer

Peter is the Principal of Peter Meijer Architect, PC. He has developed his career with a focus on the unique building sciences associated with existing and historic resources and is a well-regarded expert on the diverse issues affecting older buildings both regionally and nationally. Peter chairs the American Institute of Architects’ Historic Resource Committee and is the president of the Oregon chapter of DoCoMoMo US. He earned his Master of Architecture from the University of Illinois in 1982.

Chet Orloff

Chet Orloff

Executive Director of the Oregon Historical Society from 1991 to 2001, Chet Orloff teaches urban studies, history, and planning at Portland State University and the UofO School of Architecture. He’s the founding president and director of the international Museum of the City. He has served on the Portland Planning, Landmarks, and Arts&Culture commissions, as well as the Portland Parks Board and numerous other city, state, and national boards and committees. He recently chaired the Central City 2035 Plan Citizens Advisory Committee and chaired the new TriMet Transit Bridge Naming Committee.

Robert Walch

Robert Walch

Robert M. Walch is the Senior Deputy Clerk of the Northern Division of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. His office is located in the historic Pioneer Courthouse. He served as the Court’s project manager for the 2003-2005 renovation and restoration of the Pioneer Courthouse and the 2007-2009 renovation and restoration of the William Kenzo Nakamura United States Courthouse in Seattle, Washington. From 1990 to 2003, as Chief Deputy Clerk of the District of Oregon, he was responsible for the renovation and restoration of the James A. Redden United States Courthouse in Medford, Oregon and the John F. Kilkenny United States Courthouse and Post Office in Pendleton, Oregon. From 1994 to 1997, he was a member of the project management team responsible for the construction of the Mark O. Hatfield United States Courthouse in Portland, Oregon.

Robert Walch is a graduate of the University of South Florida and has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Historical Society since 2003.

Kelly Zusman

Kelly Zusman

Kelly A. Zusman is the Appellate Chief for the United States Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon. Following federal district court and appellate court clerkships, she joined the Department of Justice and has worked in the civil and criminal trial divisions, also serving as the office’s Senior Litigation Counsel and Criminal Discovery Trainer/Coordinator. She teaches appellate advocacy, evidence, and legal writing at the National Advocacy Center and the Northwest School of Law at Lewis & Clark, serves as the Ninth Circuit representative to the Appellate Chiefs Working Group to the Attorney General Advisory Committee, and she authored articles for the OLE Blue Book on Federal Criminal Discovery, the USA Bulletin on the

Government’s Brady Obligations, and the USA Bulletin on Appeals. She is currently a member of the Oregon State Bar Federal Practice and Procedure Committee, and has previously served as a Ninth Circuit Lawyer Representative to the Judicial Conference (2008-1011), President of the Oregon Chapter of the Federal Bar Association (2009-2010), and a Member of the Board of Directors of the U.S. District Court Historical Society (2002-2005). She is the recipient of an Attorney General Director’s Award (2013), the FBA’s James M. Burns Federal Practice Award (2011), and an Outstanding Teaching Award from Northwestern School of Law (2008).

Ex Officio—United States Court of Appeals
Ninth Circuit:

Judge Diarmuid F. O’Scannlain

Judge Diarmuid F. O’Scannlain

Judge O’Scannlain was appointed United States Circuit Judge for the Ninth Circuit by President Reagan on September 26, 1986. He received a J.D. degree in 1963 from Harvard Law School and a B.A. in 1957 from St. John’s University. He also earned the LL.M. (Judicial Process) degree at University of Virginia Law School in 1992. He was awarded the LL.D. (honoris causa) degree by the University of Notre Dame in 2002, the LL.D. (honoris causa) degree by Lewis & Clark College in 2003 and the LL.D. (honoris causa) degree by the University of Portland in 2011.

As a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, Judge O’Scannlain has participated in over 10,000 federal cases and has written hundreds of published opinions on a broad range of subjects including constitutional law, international law, securities law, administrative law, and criminal law. He hears appeals in San Francisco (court headquarters), as well as in Los Angeles (Pasadena), Portland, Seattle, Anchorage and

Honolulu. The late Chief Justice Rehnquist appointed Judge O’Scannlain to the Federal Judicial Center’s Advisory Committee on Appellate Judge Education. In 2009, Chief Justice Roberts appointed Judge O’Scannlain to the International Judicial Relations Committee of the U.S. Judicial Conference and subsequently appointed him Chairman in 2010.

President George W. Bush appointed Judge O’Scannlain to the Board of Trustees of the James Madison Memorial Fellowship Foundation in 2004. Pope Benedict XVI conferred the Order of Saint Gregory the Great on Judge and Mrs. O’Scannlain in 2007.

Judge O’Scannlain’s professional interests also include judicial administration and reform, and continuing legal education. Judge O’Scannlain is former Chair of the Judicial Division of the American Bar Association and has previously chaired the ABA’s Appellate Judges Conference, its Committee on Appellate Practice, and its 9th Appellate Practice Institute. He has testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on several occasions, the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts and Intellectual Property, and the Commission on Structural Alternatives for the Federal Courts of Appeals on the subject of court reorganization. In addition to serving as a faculty member at numerous federal appellate practice seminars for judges and attorneys, including New York University Law School’s Institute for Judicial Administration, Judge O’Scannlain is an djunct Professor at Lewis & Clark Law School where he teaches a seminar on the Supreme Court. He has served as a Moot Court Judge at distinguished law schools across the United States including Harvard, Yale Stanford, Boalt Hall (Berkeley Law), Virginia, Cornell, Notre Dame, Duke, Fordham, Alabama, University of Southern California, King Hall (U.C. Davis) and Loyola Marymount University and in China at Xiamen and Renmin Universities.

Between graduation from Harvard and investiture as a federal judge, Judge O’Scannlain was primarily engaged in private law practice. Between 1969 and 1974, he was consecutively the Deputy Attorney General of Oregon, the Public Utility Commissioner of Oregon, and Director of the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. He retired from the U.S. Army Reserve in 1978 as a Major after 23 years Reserve and National Guard service, including four years as an enlisted man.

A first generation Irish-American son of immigrant parents from Sligo and Derry, Judge O’Scannlain is married to the former Maura Nolan and has eight children: Sean, Jane, Brendan, Kevin, Megan, Christopher, Anne, and Kate, and eighteen grandchildren. His chambers are in the Pioneer Courthouse in Portland, Oregon.

Judge Edward Leavy

Judge Edward Leavy

The Honorable Edward Leavy, born August 14, 1929, was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1987 by President Ronald Reagan. He received a B.A. from University of Portland in 1950, and J.D. from Notre Dame Law School in 1953. He served as Deputy District Attorney, Lane County, Oregon from 1954 to 1957, Lane County District Judge from 1957 to 1961, Lane County Circuit Judge from 1961 to 1976, Justice Pro Tempore, Oregon Supreme Court, from October 1974 to November 1974; U.S. Magistrate for the District of Oregon, 1976 to 1984; and Judge, U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon from 1984 to 1987. In 2001, Judge Leavy was appointed by Justice Rehnquist as Judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act Court of Review, serving from 2001 to 2008 (Presiding Judge 2005 to 2008). Judge Leavy assumed senior status on the Ninth Circuit in 1997. He continues participation in the Ninth’s Circuit’s caseload, and also has served as mediator in several complex federal mediations, including United States v. Wen Ho Lee (1999- 2000); civil litigation involving large Oregon pension fraud cases (2001-2003); Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs v. United States, concerning the Tribe’s claims of trust funds mismanagement (2004 - 2006), and ongoing mediation matters involving the Confederated Tribes, the Yakima Nation, the Department of Justice, and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and California utilities.

Judge Susan P. Graber

Judge Susan P. Graber

The Honorable Susan P. Graber was appointed to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in 1998 by President Clinton. Previously she sat on the Oregon Court of Appeals (1988-90) and the Oregon Supreme Court (1990-98). Judge Graber practiced law from 1972 to 1988, most recently as a partner in the Portland office of Rives, where she specialized in employment law and other civil litigation. Judge Graber received her B.A. from Wellesley College in 1969 and her J.D. from Yale Law School in 1972.

Judge Graber has been a frequent moot court judge and has lectured and written on a wide range of legal subjects. She is a member of the Rules of Practice and Procedure Committee of the Judicial Conference of the United States. In 2000 Judge Graber chaired the American Bar Association’s Committee on Appellate Practice. She was named Oregon’s 1998 Legal Citizen of the Year, and in 2001 received Yale’s Tercentenary “For Country” Award in Oregon.